Meet the team

Healy

Dennis Healy was professor of mathematics at the University of Maryland and program manager at the DARPA, having earned his Ph.D. in mathematics from UC San Diego. Professor Healy was the primary instigator fo the A2I program, but tragically he passed away in 2009 before the completion of the project. His friendship, leadership and insight, both practical and mathematical, are dearly missed. John Benedetto, Karen Peterson, Dan Rockmore, Anna Tsao, and Steven Wax have written an obituary for SIAM News.


Team members

in alphabetical order

Stephen

Stephen Becker received his B.A. degrees in mathematics and in physics from Wesleyan University in 2005, and his Ph.D. degree in Applied & Computational Mathematics from the California Institute of Technology in 2011. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher hosted at the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions in Paris 6, thanks to a fellowship by Foundation Sciences Mathématiques de Paris. His research interests are in large-scale methods for convex programming, non-convex optimization, and image processing.

Emmanuel

Emmanuel Candès is the Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics, and Professor of Electrical Engineering (by courtesy) at Stanford University. Prior to this, he was the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. He received the Ph.D. degree in statistics from Stanford University in 1998 and the Diplôme d'Ingénieur from the Ecole Polytechnique in 1993. His research interests are in computational harmonic analysis, mathematical signal processing, information theory, mathematical optimization, statistical estimation and detection with applications to the imaging sciences, scientific computing, and inverse problems.

Professor Candès has received numerous awards, most notably the 2006 Alan T. Waterman Medal, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Science Foundation and which recognizes the achievements of scientists who are no older than 35, or not more than seven years beyond their doctorate. Other awards include an Alfred Sloan Fellowship in 2001, the Popov Prize in Approximation Theory in 2001, the 2005 James H. Wilkinson Prize in Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing awarded by the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), the 2008 Information Theory Society Paper Award, the 2010 George Polya Prize awarded by SIAM. In 2011, he received the Collatz Prize awarded every 4 years by the International Council for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM) established to "provide international recognition to individual scientists under 42 years of age for outstanding work on industrial and applied mathematics".

Daniel

Daniel Ching is currently Circuit Design Engineer at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) 1996 to present. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering, both from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. At Northrop he has worked on high-speed mixed-signal designs which ranged from PCB level down to custom transistor level IC design.

Michael

Michael C. Grant, Ph.D. is a principal at CVX Research, Inc., and the primary developer of CVX, a popular modeling framework for disciplined convex programming. The research described in this paper was conducted while Dr. Grant served as Staff Scientist in the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Grant has served as a guest lecturer at the University of Texas at Austin, as a consulting assistant professor in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University, and as a research associate in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering at Stanford University. Dr. Grant has a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

Azita

Azita Emami-Neyestanak was born in Naein, Iran. She received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1999 and 2004, respectively. She received the B.S. degree with honors from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1996. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA. From July 2006 to August 2007 she was with Columbia University, New York, NY, as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering. She also worked as a Research Staff Member at IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, from 2004 to 2006. Her current research areas are high-performance mixed-signal integrated circuits and VLSI systems, with the focus on high-speed and low-power optical and electrical interconnects, clocking, biomedical implant and compressed sensing.

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Eric

Eric B. Nakamura joined Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) - Mixed Signal and Power Center in 2002 and is the current principle investigator for the NGAS A-to-I program. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, all from the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Justin

Justin Romberg is an Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Romberg received the B.S.E.E. (1997), M.S. (1999) and Ph.D. (2004) degrees from Rice University in Houston, Texas. From Fall 2003 until Fall 2006, he was a Postdoctoral Scholar in Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. He spent the Summer of 2000 as a researcher at Xerox PARC, the Fall of 2003 as a visitor at the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions in Paris, and the Fall of 2004 as a Fellow at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics. In the Fall of 2006, he joined the ECE faculty as a member of the Center for Signal and Image Processing. In 2008 he received an ONR Young Investigator Award, in 2009 he received a PECASE award and a Packard Fellowship, and in 2010 he was named a Rice University Outstanding Young Engineering Alumnus. In 2006-2007 he was a consultant for the TV show "Numb3rs" and from 2008-2011, he was an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory.

Emilio

Emilio A. Sovero is currently VP of Technology at Waveconnex Inc (Oct 2011). He received his B.S. in Engineering, M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, and Ph.D. in Applied Physics and Information Science, all from the California Institute of Technology. Prior to his current position, in 2006 he joined Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) - Mixed Signal and Power Center as Chief Scientist. He was the program manager at NGAS of the A-to-I development.

Chris

Christopher Turnes is a graduate student at Georgia Tech.

Mike

Michael B. Wakin received the B.A. (2000) degree in mathematics and the B.S. (2000), M.S. (2002), and Ph.D. (2007) degrees in electrical engineering, all from Rice University. He was an NSF Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology from 2006-2007 and an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan from 2007-2008. He is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Colorado School of Mines. In 2007, Dr. Wakin shared the Hershel M. Rich Invention Award from Rice University for the design of a single-pixel camera based on compressive sensing; in 2008, Dr. Wakin received the DARPA Young Faculty Award for his research in compressive multi-signal processing; and in 2012, Dr. Wakin received the NSF CAREER Award for research into dimensionality reduction techniques for structured data sets.

Juhwan

Juhwan Yoo received the B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, in 2006 and 2012, respectively. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the department of electrical and computer engineering at Duke University, Durham, NC. During the summer of 2004 he held a summer internship at Finisar Corp. where he worked on multi-mode optical transceivers. He was the recipient of the Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer award in 2009. His current research interests include: mixed-signal circuit design, analog signal processing, and the application of dimensionality reduction techniques to hardware signal processing platforms.


Photos

teamPrototype I at Caltech, 2009